We will be listing and accepting events related to protests, rallies, or activism in response to the SCOTUS ruling overturning Roe v. Wade. You can also find similar events here: https://map.womensmarch.com and here: https://map.wewontgoback.com

We will continue to amplify marginalized voices, and welcome all, their ideas, their events, and their words. Our words here are not enough, but we wanted to say we support you and will continue to do so through our actions. Resources for support and relief funds can be found here and here.

For details regarding specific events please contact the organizers or venues. If you are an organizer or venue and would like to reach out to us please feel free to contact us or submit an event using our submission form. We’d love to hear from you!

Oregon Literary Fellowships Information Session

Online N/A, Portland

Questions about applying to this year’s Oregon Literary Fellowships? Join us at this information session! Drop-in anytime between 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Register in advance for this meeting here. Please contact Susan Moore (susan@literary-arts.org) or Jessica Meza-Torres (jessica@literary-arts.org) if you have any questions.  

Free

Paul Tremblay in Conversation With Stewart O’Nan

Online N/A, Portland

The Pallbearers Club (William Morrow) is a cleverly voiced psychological thriller about an unforgettable — and unsettling — friendship, with blood-chilling twists, crackling wit, and a thrumming pulse in its veins — from Paul Tremblay, author of The Cabin at the End of the World and Survivor Song. What if the coolest girl you've ever met decided to be your friend? Art Barbara was so not cool. He was a 17-year-old high school loner in the late 1980s who listened to hair metal, had to wear a monstrous back-brace at night for his scoliosis, and started an extracurricular club for volunteer pallbearers at poorly attended funerals. But his new friend thought the Pallbearers Club was cool. And she brought along her Polaroid camera to take…

Free

Matthew Dickman in Conversation With Chelsea Bieker

Powell's City of Books 1005 W Burnside Street, Portland

Guided by acclaimed poet Matthew Dickman’s signature “clarity and ability to engage” (David Kirby, New York Times), Husbandry (W. W. Norton) is a love song from a father to his children. Written after a separation and during overwhelming single-fatherhood in the early days of COVID-19 lockdowns, Husbandry refuses romantic notions of parenting and embraces all its mess, anguish, humor, fear, boredom, and warmth. Dickman composes these poems entirely in vivid couplets that animate the various domestic pairs of broken-up parents, two sons, love and grief. He explores the terrain of his children’s dreams and nightmares, the almost primal fears that spill into his own, and the residual impacts of his parents’ failures. Threading his anxieties with bright moments of beauty and gratitude, the volume delights…

Free