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Tag: annie bloom’s

Reading: Kate Ristau: Shadow Queene

Annie Bloom’s welcomes back local author Kate Ristau to read from Shadow Queene, the long-awaited sequel to the enchanting dark fairy young adult novel, Shadow Girl. Just when her dreams are about to come true, Hennessey’s world is torn apart. She is dragged into the Shadowlands, while Áine is forced into the light. But in a world of magic and darkness, where the fae whither and monsters reign, Hennessey finds a power all her own. She embraces the shadows and enters the endless night.

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Livestream Reading! Steven Mayfield: Treasure of the Blue Whale

This previously in-store reading will now be livestreamed! See our Facebook event page Annie Bloom’s welcomes local author Steven Mayfield to read from his novel, Treasure of the Blue Whale. In this whimsical, often funny, Depression-era tale, young Connor O’Halloran decides to share a treasure he’s discovered on an isolated stretch of Northern California beach. Almost overnight, his sleepy seaside village is comically transformed into a bastion of consumerism, home to a commode with a jeweled seat cover, a pair of genuinely fake rare documents, a mail-order bride, and an organ-grinder’s monkey named Mr. Sprinkles. But when it turns out that the treasure is not real, Connor must conspire with Miss Lizzie Fryberg and a handful of town leaders he’s dubbed The Ambergrisians to save…

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CANCELED – Poetry Reading: Linda Bierds & David Biespiel

Annie Bloom’s welcomes Northwest poets Linda Bierds & David Biespiel. The Hardy Tree is Washington poet Linda Bierds’s latest collection. Focusing on figures such as Thomas Hardy, Alan Turing, Virginia Woolf, and the World War One poets, The Hardy Tree examines power, oppression and individual rights in ways that reverberate through our lives today. Uniting these themes is the issue of communication–the various methods and codes we use to reach one another. The book is arranged in four sections. The first visits Vladimir Nabokov as a child with alphabet blocks, Alan Turing at eleven writing home from boarding school with a “pen of his own making,” Virginia Woolf as a teenager practicing her penmanship, and Wilfred Owen trying to draw a musical note from a…

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Poetry Reading: Judith Montgomery and Carol Barrett

In Mercy, local poet Judith Montgomery chronicles the story of caring for her husband as he endures cancer treatment. Though brutal in its technology, the medical world Montgomery describes is merciful in its human form, peopled by chemotherapy nurses whose expertise is matched by mercy, as they “lift the plumped / sac, poisons mixed to pour fire into flesh.” Anyone who has had even the least brush with cancer will find here an honest and hopeful world, where suffering is lightened by the sight of butterflies, “mutable flames that glide as we– / refugees from the cancer center, / and stunned by treatment– / … glide in luxurious / light, afloat in paradise.” Pansies, Oregon poet Carol Barrett’s collection of thirty slight, delicate vignettes, recounts…

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Reading: Cai Emmons & Tammy Lynne Stoner

Annie Bloom’s welcomes Oregon authors Cai Emmons & Tammy Lynne Stoner. The characters in Cai Emmons’s Vanishing: Stories operate in a world in which their voices are not heard, and are navigating prickly paths, doing what they can to survive. An attorney, mother of twin babies, is destabilized when her husband is away, and comes to doubt she has a right to her own house; a young artist thinks she knows the score when she moves from LA to New York, only to be forced to look past stereotypes to discover what really matters; a documentary filmmaker, rattled by her recent divorce, visits her oldest childhood friend, who is several years into debilitating dementia, and realizes how quickly shared history can vanish; a woman in…

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Reading: Laura Munson: Willa’s Grove

Annie Bloom’s welcomes back Montana author Laura Munson, whose new novel is Willa’s Grove. Three women, from coast to coast and in between, open their mailboxes to the same intriguing invitation. Although leading entirely different lives, each has found herself at a similar, jarring crossroads. Right when these women thought they’d be comfortably settling into middle age, their carefully curated futures have turned out to be dead ends. The sender of the invitation is Willa Silvester, who is reeling from the untimely death of her beloved husband and the reality that she must say goodbye to the small mountain town they founded together. Yet as Willa mourns her losses, an impossible question keeps staring her in the face: So now what? Struggling to find the…

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Reading: Phillip Margolin: A Reasonable Doubt

Portland thriller writer Phillip Margolin’s latest, A Reasonable Doubt, is the third in his Robin Lockwood series. Robin Lockwood is a young criminal defense attorney and partner in a prominent law firm in Portland, Oregon. A former MMA fighter and Yale Law graduate, she joined the firm of legal legend Regina Barrister not long before Regina was forced into retirement by early onset Alzheimer’s. One of Regina’s former clients, Robert Chesterfield, shows up in the law office with an odd request—he’s seeking help from his old attorney in acquiring patent protection for an illusion. Chesterfield is a professional magician of some renown and he has a major new trick he’s about to debut. This is out of the scope of the law firm’s expertise, but when…

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Reading: Katharine Coldiron, Jackie Shannon Hollis, and Claire Rudy Foster

Los Angeles author Katharine Coldiron presents Ceremonials, a twelve-part lyric novella inspired by Florence + the Machine’s 2011 album of the same name. It’s the story of two girls, Amelia and Corisande, who fall in love at a boarding school. Corisande dies suddenly on the eve of graduation, but Amelia cannot shake her ghost. A narrative about obsession, the Minotaur, and the veil between life and death, Ceremonials is a poem in prose, a keening in words, and a song etched in ink. “Between poetry and prose, between word and music, Katharine Coldiron’s hybrid tour de force, Ceremonials, is a loveletter between art and the body. This book makes my whole body ring like a tuning fork inside its lyric narratives. A specular devotional between artists,…

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Reading: Jody J. Little: Worse Than Weird

Annie Bloom’s welcomes back Portland children’s author Jody Little, to read from Worse Than Weird. Readers who love Leslie Connor and Ann M. Martin will adore this story of a citywide scavenger hunt and a girl who learns that family—and weirdness—is relative. Hoping to ditch two months of chicken coops, kale, and her parents’ antiscreen rules, Mac MacLeod sets out to win a citywide food cart scavenger hunt and the money she needs for the summer coding camp of her dreams. But Mac discovers more than just clues during her cross-city sprint—like how her weird parents might not be the worst thing compared to the circumstances of those around her. With the same humor and hope of her debut novel, Mostly the Honest Truth, Jody…

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Reading: Cindy Williams Gutiérrez, Kate Gray, Gemma Whelan

In celebration of International Women’s Day, Annie Bloom’s welcomes Cindy Williams Gutiérrez, Kate Gray, and Gemma Whelan. Cindy Williams Gutiérrez’s new poetry collection is Inlay with Nacre. Poet-dramatist Gutiérrez explores the global oppression of women–and testifies to their resilience–in over 20 countries around the world. Based on real-life incidents ranging from Brazilian “honor killings” and Indian sati to Ireland’s Magdalene Laundries and “Mississippi appendectomies” to rape as a weapon during the Rwandan genocide, this poetry collection bears witness to the sociocultural forces that have waged war on women’s bodies, freedom, and humanity. Now, in the #MeToo era, these poems both underscore and expand the conversation on the diminishment of women, reverberating across all continents and through 43 centuries. Inlay with Nacre is herstory–the plight of…

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