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Thom Hartmann

In his new book, The Hidden History of the War on Voting (Berrett-Koehler), progressive radio host Thom Hartmann unveils the strategies and tactics that conservative elites in this country have used, from the foundation of the Electoral College to the latest voter ID laws, to protect their interests by preventing “the wrong people” – such as the poor, women, and people of color – from voting, while making it more convenient for the wealthy and white. He also lays out a variety of simple, common-sense ways that we the people can fight back and reclaim our right to rule through the ballot box.

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John Sayles

In Yellow Earth, the site of Three Nations reservations on the Missouri River in North Dakota, film director and author John Sayles introduces us to Harleigh Killdeer, chairman of the Tribal Business Council, who is contracted by an oil firm to spearhead the new Three Nations Petroleum Company. What follows in his new novel, Yellow Earth (Haymarket), with characteristic lyrical dexterity, insight, and wit, introduces us to a memorable cast of characters, weaving together narratives of competing worlds through masterful storytelling. Set shortly before Standing Rock would become a symbol of historic proportions of the brutal confrontation between Native resistance and the forces of big business and law enforcement, the fate of Yellow Earth serves as a parable for our times.

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Dan Pfeiffer

From Dan Pfeiffer, cohost of Pod Save America, comes Un-Trumping America (Twelve), a sharp political playbook for how Democrats can take on Trump, McConnell, Fox News, and the rest of the right-wing circus dominating American politics. Pfeiffer worked for nearly 20 years at the center of Democratic politics, from the campaign trail to Capitol Hill to Barack Obama’s White House. Here, Pfeiffer urges Democrats to embrace bold solutions – from fixing the courts to abolishing the electoral college to eliminating the filibuster – in order to make America more democratic (and Democratic).

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Courtney Maum in Conversation With Kimberly King Parsons

It is 1937, and Europe is on the brink of war. Hitler is circulating a most-wanted list of “cultural degenerates.” To prevent the destruction of her favorite art (and artists), impetuous American heiress and art collector Leonora Calaway begins chartering boats and planes for an elite group of surrealists to Costalegre, a mysterious resort in the Mexican jungle. The story of what happens to these artists when they reach their destination is told from the point of view of Lara, Leonora’s neglected 15-year-old daughter. Heartbreaking and strange, Courtney Maum’s Costalegre (Tin House) is inspired by the real-life relationship between the heiress Peggy Guggenheim and her daughter, Pegeen. Maum will be joined in conversation by Kimberly King Parsons, author of Black Light.

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Megan Fernandes

In an era of rising nationalism and geopolitical instability, Megan Fernandes’s Good Boys (Tin House) offers a complex portrait of messy feminist rage, negotiations with race and travel, and existential dread in the Anthropocene. Ultimately, Fernandes’s poems possess an affection for the doomed: false beloveds, the hounded earth, civilizations intent on their own ruin.

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Sierra Crane Murdoch in Conversation With Rebecca Clarren

When Lissa Yellow Bird was released from prison in 2009, she found her home, the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota, transformed by the Bakken oil boom. The landscape had been altered beyond recognition, her tribal government swayed by corporate interests, and her community burdened by a surge in violence and addiction. Three years later, when Lissa learned that a young white oil worker, Kristopher ‘KC’ Clarke, had disappeared from his reservation worksite, she became particularly concerned. Unfolding like a gritty mystery, Sierra Crane Murdoch’s Yellow Bird (Random House) traces Lissa’s steps as she obsessively hunts for clues to Clarke’s disappearance. Crane Murdoch will be joined in conversation by Rebecca Clarren, author of Kickdown.

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Jenny Offill in Conversation With Claire Vaye Watkins

Lizzie Benson slid into her job as a librarian without a degree, but this gives her a vantage point from which to practice her other calling: she is a fake shrink. For years she has tended to her God-haunted mother and her recovering addict brother. They have both stabilized for the moment, but soon Lizzie’s old mentor makes a proposal. She’s become famous for her podcast, Hell and High Water, and wants to hire Lizzie to answer the mail she receives: from left-wingers worried about climate change and right-wingers worried about the decline of western civilization. From Jenny Offill, author of Dept. of Speculation, comes Weather (Knopf), a shimmering tour de force about a family, and a nation, in crisis. Offill will be joined in…

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Gish Jen

The time: not so long from now. The place: AutoAmerica. The land: half under water. The Internet: one part artificial intelligence, one part surveillance technology, and oddly human. The people: divided. The angel-fair “Netted” have jobs, and literally occupy the high ground. The “Surplus” live on swampland if they’re lucky, on water if they’re not. A moving story of an America that seems ever more possible, Gish Jen’s The Resisters (Knopf) is the tale of one family struggling to maintain its humanity and normalcy in circumstances that threaten their every value – as well as their existence.

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Sexual Citizens: A Landmark Study of Sex, Power, and Assault on Campus

The fear of campus sexual assault has become an inextricable part of the college experience. Research has shown that by the time they graduate, as many as one in three women and almost one in six men will have been sexually assaulted. Drawing on the Sexual Health Initiative to Foster Transformation (SHIFT) at Columbia University, the most comprehensive study of sexual assault on a campus to date, Shamus Khan presents a new framework that emphasizes sexual assault’s social roots. Empathetic and insightful, Sexual Citizens (W. W. Norton) (coauthored by Jennifer S. Hirsch) transforms our understanding of sexual assault and offers a roadmap for how to address it.

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Believe Me: How Trusting Women Can Change the World

Harvey Weinstein. Brett Kavanaugh. Jeffrey Epstein. Donald Trump. The most infamous abusers in modern American history are being outed as women speak up to publicly expose behavior that was previously only whispered about – and it’s both making an impact and sparking a backlash. Believe Me (Seal) brings readers into the evolving landscape of the movement against sexual violence, and outlines how trusting women is the critical foundation for future progress. Editor Jaclyn Friedman will be joined in conversation by Believe Me contributors Katherine Cross and Sassafras Lowery.

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