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Tag: conversation

Sandra Cisneros: Presented with Wisconsin Book Festival

Join Literary Arts and the Wisconsin Book Festival for a conversation with Sandra Cisneros about her new novel, Martita, I Remember You/Martita, te recuerdo. Cisneros will be interviewed by Kali Fajardo-Anstine, author of Sabrina & Corina. About Martita, I Remember You / Martita, te recuerdo, a story in English and Spanish: A long-forgotten letter sets off a charged encounter with the past in this poignant and gorgeously told tale masterfully told by Sandra Cisneros, the celebrated bestselling author of The House on Mango Street, in a beautiful dual-language edition. As a young woman, Corina leaves her Mexican family in Chicago to pursue her dream of becoming a writer in the cafes of Paris. Instead, she spends her brief time in the City of Light running out of…

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Margaret Renkl in Conversation With Mary Laura Philpott

For the past four years, Margaret Renkl’s columns have offered readers of The New York Times a weekly dose of natural beauty, human decency, and persistent hope from her home in Nashville. Now more than 60 of those pieces have been brought together in a sparkling new collection from the author of Late Migrations: A Natural History of Love and Loss. “People have often asked me how it feels to be the ‘voice of the South,’” writes Renkl in her introduction. “But I’m not the voice of the South, and no one else is, either.” There are many Souths — red and blue, rural and urban, mountain and coast, Black and white and brown — and no one writer could possibly represent all of them.…

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Ari Honarvar in Conversation With Ashleigh Renard

A Girl Called Rumi (Forest Avenue Press), Ari Honarvar’s debut novel, weaves a captivating tale of survival, redemption, and the power of storytelling. Kimia, a successful spiritual advisor whose Iranian childhood continues to haunt her, collides with a mysterious giant bird in her mother’s California garage. She begins reliving her experience as a nine-year-old girl in war-torn Iran, including her friendship with a mystical storyteller who led her through the mythic Seven Valleys of Love. Grappling with her unresolved past, Kimia agrees to accompany her ailing mother back to Iran, only to arrive in the midst of the Green Uprising in the streets. Against the backdrop of the election protests, Kimia begins to unravel the secrets of the night that broke her mother and produced…

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Dave Zirin in Conversation With Etan Thomas

In 2016, amid an epidemic of police shootings of African Americans, celebrated NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick began a series of quiet protests on the field, refusing to stand during the U.S. national anthem. By “taking a knee,” Kaepernick bravely joined a long tradition of American athletes making powerful political statements. This time, however, Kaepernick’s simple act spread like wildfire throughout American society, becoming the preeminent symbol of resistance to America’s persistent racial inequality. Critically acclaimed sports journalist and author of A People’s History of Sports in the United States, Dave Zirin chronicles “the Kaepernick effect” for the first time, through interviews with a broad cross-section of professional athletes across many different sports, college stars and high-powered athletic directors, and high school athletes and coaches. In…

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Defne Suman in Conversation With Maureen Freely

Set in the ancient city of Smyrna, Defne Suman’s powerful novel, The Silence of Scheherazade (Head of Zeus), follows the intertwining fates of four families as their peaceful city is ripped apart by the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire. On an orange-tinted evening in September 1905, Scheherazade is born to an opium-dazed mother in the ancient city of Smyrna. At the very same moment, a dashing Indian spy arrives in the harbor with a secret mission from the British Empire. He sails in to golden-hued spires and minarets, scents of fig and sycamore, and the cries of street hawkers selling their wares. When he leaves, 17 years later, it will be to the heavy smell of kerosene and smoke as the city, and its people,…

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Premise Conversation Course: How will the pandemic change us and our world? Camus’ The Plague

How will the pandemic change us and our world? Camus’ The Plague (Learn about what a Premise class is like here: https://www.premiseinstitute.com/premisefaq ) Many of us have described the past year as apocalyptic. We’ve been living through a global pandemic, a critical presidential election, destructive wildfires, and a national reckoning with our country’s legacy of racism and police violence. Literature and philosophy can help us make sense of our experiences and ask questions about our future. In this class, we’ll read works set during pandemics. We will start with Albert Camus’ existential novel The Plague and look deeply at themes of isolation, loneliness, and fate. Together, we’ll use The Plague to dig into the ways the COVID-19 pandemic has changed our lives and discuss relevant…

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Dr. Jennifer Lincoln in Conversation With Dr. Jen Gunter

Dr. Jennifer Lincoln has been sharing her expertise as an OB-GYN to her millions of followers on TikTok, and now in her accessible, illustrated guide she answers real questions about vaginal, sexual, and reproductive health for fans and new readers alike. Let’s Talk About Down There (Andrews McMeel) is like the health class you wish you had — think evidence-based, myth-busting sex ed where shame gets tossed out the window — in a format that’s as approachable as a 15-second video. Addressing topics such as hormones, menstrual cups, and birth control, all with the help of infographics and illustrations, Dr. Lincoln’s succinct, vibrant handbook answers the questions that you may have been too embarrassed to ask, so you’ll be empowered to make more informed health…

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Thom Hartmann

In his new book, The Hidden History of American Healthcare (Berrett-Koehler), popular progressive radio host Thom Hartmann reveals how and why attempts to implement affordable universal healthcare in the United States have been thwarted and what we can do to finally make it a reality. For-profit health insurance is the largest con job ever perpetrated on the American people — one that has cost trillions of dollars and millions of lives since the 1940s. Other countries have shown us that affordable universal healthcare is not only possible but also effective and efficient. Taiwan’s single-payer system saved the country a fortune as well as saving lives during the coronavirus pandemic, enabling the country to implement a nationwide coronavirus test-and-contact-trace program without shutting down the economy. This…

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Historians and the News: Kathleen Belew

A Historical Perspective on the White Power Movement, the January 6 Insurrection, and the Domestic Legacies of Overseas Wars OHS is excited to re-launch the popular “Historians and the News” series with a conversation between Dr. Kathleen Belew and Dr. Christopher McKnight Nichols. This free virtual event promises to offer valuable insights, informed by years of scholarly analysis of the past, into the news stories that fill our screens and newspaper pages. As the House select committee investigating the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6 has begun to hold hearings and new reporting reveals the seriousness of the attempt to overturn the 2020 election, militaristic white-supremacist organizations such as the Proud Boys continue to hold rallies in cities including Portland, Salem, and…

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Jane Kirkpatrick in Conversation With Craig Johnson

Classically trained pianist and singer Natalie Curtis isolated herself for five years after a breakdown just before she was to debut with the New York Philharmonic. Guilt-ridden and songless, Natalie can’t seem to recapture the joy music once brought her. In 1902, her brother invites her to join him in the West to search for healing. What she finds are songs she’d never before encountered — the haunting melodies, rhythms, and stories of Native Americans. But their music is under attack. The US government’s Code of Offenses prohibits America’s Indigenous people from singing, dancing, or speaking their own languages as the powers that be insist on assimilation. Natalie makes it her mission not only to document these songs before they disappear but to appeal to…

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