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Tag: fiction

Bookmark 2021

Literary Arts is proud to invite you to Bookmark 2021, a celebration of the stories in our community and the essential ideas and issues they raise. Join us on Thursday, October 7, 2021 at 5:30PM (PST) for a special pre-show in advance of the 6:00PM (PST) event to support readers, writers, and the next generation of storytellers. You’ll hear moving stories from artists within our community, as well as surprise special guests, performances, and more! Throughout the evening, you can directly support the work we do to shape the future of storytelling in Oregon. If you have any questions, please contact Maggie Allen at maggie@literary-arts.org. How do I participate in the virtual event? Click on the livestream button above to join the event on Thursday,…

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Friends of Mystery Presents: Tracy Clark, Mary Keliikoa, and Elle Marr

Please join us to kick off the first Bloody Thursday of our 2021/22 season with writers Tracy Clark, Mary Keliikoa, and Elle Marr! Our virtual door will open at 6:30 for general chat, with the moderated discussion starting at 7 PM. We will send out a Zoom link on the day of the event. About the Speakers: Tracy Clark, a native Chicagoan, is the author of the Cass Raines Chicago Mystery series, featuring ex-cop turned PaI Cassandra Raines. Her debut, BROKEN PLACES, made Library Journal’s list of the Best Crime Fiction of 2018 and CrimeReads named Cass Raines Best New PI of 2018. The novel was nominated for a Lefty Award for Best Debut Novel, an Anthony Award for Best Debut Novel and a Shamus…

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Jane Kirkpatrick in Conversation With Craig Johnson

Classically trained pianist and singer Natalie Curtis isolated herself for five years after a breakdown just before she was to debut with the New York Philharmonic. Guilt-ridden and songless, Natalie can’t seem to recapture the joy music once brought her. In 1902, her brother invites her to join him in the West to search for healing. What she finds are songs she’d never before encountered — the haunting melodies, rhythms, and stories of Native Americans. But their music is under attack. The US government’s Code of Offenses prohibits America’s Indigenous people from singing, dancing, or speaking their own languages as the powers that be insist on assimilation. Natalie makes it her mission not only to document these songs before they disappear but to appeal to…

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Delve Readers Seminar: James Baldwin

Explore James Baldwin’s first two novels – Go Tell It on the Mountain and Giovanni’s Room – and some of his early essays in order to deepen your understanding of the intersection of identity, morality, and power. What do these early works teach about Baldwin’s response to his own question: what does it mean to be an honest person and a good writer? September 1 – October 6, 2021 Wednesdays, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. (six sessions) online via Zoom Guide: Nicholas Buccola Nicholas Buccola is the author of The Fire Is Upon Us,The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass and the editor of The Essential Douglass and Abraham Lincoln and Liberal Democracy. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Salon, and many other publications. He is the Elizabeth and Morris Glicksman…

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BIPOC Revision Workshop

This affinity space for BIPOC writers will support the transformation of your early drafts into new iterations and more polished pieces. How do we revise our writing in ways that feel energized and nimble? How do we identify writing habits that aren’t serving us and gather inspiration from fellow writers? What can supportive feedback offer to our word choice, sentences, and overall structure of our piece? How can we be intentional about the writing moves we’re making for clarity, engagement, and authentic voice? This seasonal workshop is an affinity space for BIPOC writers to level up their writing in a supportive environment. We will refine our lens for spotting more of what we want from style, craft, structure, and content through an exploration of our…

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Cirque Journal at the Kennedy School

Join Cirque Journal publisher, writers and fans for an evening of readings, book signings, and rubbing elbows with poets, essayists, fiction writers, dramatists, graphic artists for engaged literary arts fun. Learn how to publish with Cirque Press, and submit to Cirque Journal; be a fan. We want you all to have a chance to try your hand at submitting to this 11-year-old fine literary-arts journal out of Alaska, but for PNW/Alaska/ Canada/ Hawaii writers. Cirque #22 is just out, and it has a theme — The Land Ethic. Just out May 2021, available now and at the Kennedy School event.

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Delve Readers Seminar: The Book of Embraces

The vignetted format of this text sometimes expands into short stories and sometimes shrinks into prose-poems, but regardless of any section’s length, this book is always intimate, charming, and transportive. Galeano uses journalistic research, autobiographical anecdotes, and interviews to emphasize how there really is no distinction between the personal and the political. He writes of the military dictatorship in Uruguay that forced him into exile, an Italian pantomime performance that reminded him the importance of loving your craft, a pet guinea pig that’s too afraid to leave its cage, the Chilean government’s despoiling of Pablo Neruda’s home, the fantastic dreams of his wife, and a few hundred other vignettes that advocate for love, friendship, and determination. A powerful text that uplifts humanity in the face…

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August BIPOC Craft Series: Fiction

This monthly craft series for BIPOC writers invites you to dream and imagine new worlds and characters for fictional storytelling. Using beloved and renowned BIPOC writers as models for fictional narratives, we will notice, play, practice, share and grow as writers. Access Program We want our writing classes to be accessible to everyone, regardless of income and background. We understand that our tuition structure can present obstacles for some people. Our Access Program offers writing class registrations at a reduced rate. The access program for writing classes covers 60% of the class tuition. Most writing classses have at least one access spot available. Contact Susan Moore at susan@literary-arts.org if you would like to take a writing class at the Access Rate. Jacqueline Fitzgerald is an…

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James Lee Burke in Conversation With Charlaine Harris

The American West in the early 1960s appears to be a pastoral paradise: golden wheat fields, mist-filled canyons, frolicking animals. Aspiring novelist Aaron Holland Broussard has observed it from the open door of a boxcar, riding the rails for both inspiration and odd jobs. Jumping off in Denver, he finds work on a farm and meets Joanne McDuffy, an articulate and fierce college student and gifted painter. Their soul connection is immediate, but their romance is complicated by Joanne’s involvement with a shady professor who is mixed up with a drug-addled cult. When a sinister businessman and his son who wield their influence through vicious cruelty set their sights on Aaron, drawing him into an investigation of grotesque murders, it is clear that this idyllic…

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August BIPOC writer workshop

For BIPOC writers Searching for a space to create new work with fellow BIPOC writers? This two-hour workshop meets on Zoom. A variety of prompts will be presented as avenues for generating and sharing new work in an informal setting. Open to BIPOC writers at all levels writing in poetry, fiction, or nonfiction. Scholarships are available. Contact Susan Moore at susan@literary-arts.org for more information. Jacqueline Fitzgerald is an educator, coach, writer, and musician who believes that creation is a catalyst for transformation. Working at the cross-section of art, healing, and change work, Jacqueline has a passion for stories and their ability to cultivate belonging. Her writing has been published in the Oregonian, The Learning Network of the New York Times, and Beacon Magazine. Currently, she…

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