Skip to content →

Tag: literary arts

The Moth Mainstage in Portland

The Moth is true stories, told live and without notes. The Moth celebrates the ability of stories to honor both the diversity and commonality of human experience, and to satisfy a vital human need for connection. It seeks to present recognized storytellers among established and emerging writers, performers and artists and to encourage storytelling among communities whose stories often go unheard. Presented by Literary Arts.

Comments closed

Portland Book Festival 2021

Portland Book Festival 2021 will be a hybrid event. There will be virtual events from November 8–12, leading up to an in-person festival day on Saturday, November 13, 2021 at Portland Art Museum and Portland’5, as well as in-person writing workshops at our downtown Literary Arts space. We will announce this year’s lineup of authors and events and tickets will go on sale on September 22. Youth 17 and under (and/or with a valid high school I.D.) will receive free entry. Although this continues to be an uncertain time, Literary Arts remains committed to the safety of all readers and writers and will follow all health and safety guidelines. Whether you join us online or in-person, we are excited to build community and celebrate books, storytelling, and the power of…

Comments closed

Delve Readers Seminar: Homer, The Odyssey

The Odyssey is one of the world’s oldest and most enduring works of literature. Homer’s ancient Greek epic has inspired many modern artists and has introduced generations of readers to the the world of Greek myth, poetry, and storytelling.  In this seminar, we will explore the intricacies of Homer’s epic and its central story— Odysseus’s effort to return home from the Trojan War and reunite with his wife and son.  We will use the much heralded new translation by Emily Wilson. The Odyssey was also the principal inspiration for James Joyce’s Ulysses, the modernist epic of everyday life, that will be the focus of a Delve seminar next Spring, the 100th anniversary of its publication on February 2, 1922.   Participants in the Ulysses seminar are encouraged, though not required…

Comments closed

Memoir Infusion

The past is never dead. It’s not even past. – William Faulkner If the primary purpose of literature is connection, what better way to accomplish that goal than through telling our experiences and how they formed us. This 8-week course is designed for writers already engaged in writing a memoir, who have some knowledge of the craft, and have begun a few chapters of a full-length memoir or have a handful of connected essays for a series of personal essays. Together we’ll discuss elements of craft including, but not limited to, narrative drive and tension, time, scene vs. summary narration, character development (including dialogue), ethics of truth and our faulty memories as we try to recreate our pasts on the page. We’ll also study structure,…

Comments closed

Six-Month Short Story Intensive: Starting the Collection

This class is for experienced writers who are dedicated to starting the first draft of a story collection over the course of 6 months. We will have 22 class meetings between October and April, with a four-week break in December to focus on generating and revising our work. Participants should have experience writing stories and familiarity with the elements of literary short fiction including scene, character, conflict, place and revision. We will study individual stories by authors, read craft essays, and discuss several published collections and how the stories unite to form a book. This class is specifically designed for writers who are comfortable in a workshop setting. We will be giving and receiving feedback on works in progress at each of our meetings. Students…

Comments closed

Delve Readers Seminar: Herman Melville: Great Shorter Works

Although Herman Melville is best known for Moby-Dick, he also demonstrated mastery of the novella, and this Delve will explore Melville’s best-known shorter works: Bartleby the Scrivener, famous for the Wall Street denizen who “would prefer not to,” no matter what his employer might want; Benito Cereno, where a captain answering a ship’s call of distress ends up in a situation far more perplexing—and dangerous—than what he had bargained for; and the posthumously-published masterpiece, Billy Budd, a story of the “handsome sailor” whose beauty and simplicity result in tragedy and a crisis of conscience for his captain. In each of the three weeks of this Delve, we will examine one of these shorter works and discuss their position in Melville’s unusual literary career and the…

Comments closed

The Trauma-Informed Creative Writing Classroom

The creative writing classroom is not an explicitly healing space—yet writers regularly bring their stories of trauma into workshops. What are our obligations to these students as instructors? What are the best practices for managing workshop discussions about potentially triggering material? In this 6-hour intensive, learn when writing heals and harms, discuss syllabus disclaimers and content warnings, identify craft issues common to trauma writing, consider how feedback lands in an activated nervous system, and assess your own self-regulation skills. This class is limited to 15 students. October 23 and 24, 2021 Saturday and Sunday, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. (two sessions) Online via Zoom Katherine Standefer Katherine Standefer is the author of Lightning Flowers: My Journey To Uncover the Cost of Saving a Life, which…

Comments closed

The Lyric Essay Intensive: Braiding the World

The lyric essay is a form which allows many small fragments to be drawn together to create a whole. A lyric essay might hold memories, research, a bit of poetry; it celebrates mixing genres. In this workshop, we will write a series of fragments, and then braid them together into essays. You will leave the workshop with a sense of how small pieces of writing can grow into essays. By the end of the 8 weeks, you will have at least one lyric essay to share. Access Program We want our writing classes to be accessible to everyone, regardless of income and background. We understand that our tuition structure can present obstacles for some people. Our Access Program offers writing class registrations at a reduced…

Comments closed

October BIPOC Writers Workshop

For BIPOC writers Searching for a space to create new work with fellow BIPOC writers? This two-hour workshop meets on Zoom. A variety of prompts will be presented as avenues for generating and sharing new work in an informal setting. Open to BIPOC writers at all levels writing in poetry, fiction, or nonfiction. Scholarships are available. Contact Susan Moore at susan@literary-arts.org for more information. Jacqueline Fitzgerald is a transformation coach, educator, and artist who centers healing, creativity, and embodied equity to cultivate collective belonging. After over a decade of experience as a teacher and facilitator in Portland area public schools, Jacque brings a trauma-informed, joyful, and loving approach to her values re-alignment work. Her writing has been published in The Oregonian, The Learning Network of…

Comments closed

2021/22 Portland Arts & Lectures: Daniel James Brown

This event is part of our Portland Arts & Lectures 2021/22 season.  Daniel James Brown will be appearing via telecast from Seattle. Daniel James Brown will not be traveling to Portland for his event. Instead, he will appear live via telecast from a studio in Seattle and will be joined in conversation after his lecture with Tom Ikeda, executive director of Densho (Ikeda penned the introduction to Brown’s Facing the Mountain). We will still hold an in-person presentation of the telecast at 7:30 p.m. on October 14 at the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall in Portland. Subscribers are welcome to view the event virtually from their own homes, or to join us in-person at the Schnitzer, and watch the event projected on a large screen in…

Comments closed