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Tag: politics

Writing And/As the Mother with Amanda Montei

Writers, artists, and theorists have long used the figure of The Mother to make sense of what we seek in writing, art, and politics. Today, The Mother remains a receptacle for all our cultural anxieties and longings. And yet, the work of taking care, cleaning up, and maintaining life—which someone must do to make space for creative practice— is too often rendered invisible. How have the body and labor of The Mother shaped our ideas of comfort, home, work, and novelty? How does caring for others, big and small, teach us to care on the page? Should the book be a space in which we are held, or perhaps something else entirely? In this 4-week course, we will discuss the cultural and political influences that…

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Dave Zirin in Conversation With Etan Thomas

In 2016, amid an epidemic of police shootings of African Americans, celebrated NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick began a series of quiet protests on the field, refusing to stand during the U.S. national anthem. By “taking a knee,” Kaepernick bravely joined a long tradition of American athletes making powerful political statements. This time, however, Kaepernick’s simple act spread like wildfire throughout American society, becoming the preeminent symbol of resistance to America’s persistent racial inequality. Critically acclaimed sports journalist and author of A People’s History of Sports in the United States, Dave Zirin chronicles “the Kaepernick effect” for the first time, through interviews with a broad cross-section of professional athletes across many different sports, college stars and high-powered athletic directors, and high school athletes and coaches. In…

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Historians and the News: Kathleen Belew

A Historical Perspective on the White Power Movement, the January 6 Insurrection, and the Domestic Legacies of Overseas Wars OHS is excited to re-launch the popular “Historians and the News” series with a conversation between Dr. Kathleen Belew and Dr. Christopher McKnight Nichols. This free virtual event promises to offer valuable insights, informed by years of scholarly analysis of the past, into the news stories that fill our screens and newspaper pages. As the House select committee investigating the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6 has begun to hold hearings and new reporting reveals the seriousness of the attempt to overturn the 2020 election, militaristic white-supremacist organizations such as the Proud Boys continue to hold rallies in cities including Portland, Salem, and…

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Daisy Hernández in Conversation With Amy Stewart

Growing up in a New Jersey factory town in the 1980s, Daisy Hernández believed that her aunt had become deathly ill from eating an apple. No one in her family, in either the United States or Colombia, spoke of infectious diseases, and even into her thirties, she only knew that her aunt had died of a rare illness called Chagas. But as Hernández dug deeper, she discovered that Chagas — or the kissing bug disease — is more prevalent in the United States than the Zika virus. Today, more than 300,000 Americans have Chagas. Why do some infectious diseases make headlines and others fall by the wayside? After her aunt’s death, Hernández begins searching for answers about who our nation chooses to take care of…

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“From South Street to Not Doctor Street: Historicism and the African American Novel” with Kenneth Warren

Join us for “From South Street to Not Doctor Street: Historicism and the African American Novel,” a lecture with Kenneth Warren. Prof. Warren’s lecture will be followed by a question and answer session. Kenneth Warren is Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of English at The University of Chicago. His work focuses on American and African American literature from the late nineteenth through the middle of the twentieth century, in particular the way debates about literary form and genre articulate with discussions of political and social change. He is the author of three books: What Was African American Literature? (2010), So Black and Blue: Ralph Ellison and the Occasion of Criticism (2003), and Black and White Strangers: Race and American Literary Realism (1993).

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Oregon Historical Society’s Mark O. Hatfield Lecture Series: Jon Meacham

His Truth Is Marching On: John Lewis and the Power of Hope Presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham is one of America’s most prominent public intellectuals. A contributor to TIME and The New York Times Book Review, Meacham is a highly sought-after commentator, regularly appearing on CNN and MSNBC. Known as a skilled orator with a depth of knowledge about politics, religion, and current affairs, Meacham brings historical context to the issues and events affecting our daily lives. In his latest #1 New York Times best-seller, His Truth is Marching On, Meacham draws on decades of wide-ranging interviews with the late Congressman John Lewis. In this biography, Meacham shares how Lewis, the great-grandson of a man who was enslaved and son of an…

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An Evening with Elaine Weiss

One hundred years after the ratification of the 19th Amendment, the Oregon Historical Society is excited to host Elaine Weiss for a powerful lecture on her latest book, The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote. This special lecture is presented in collaboration with our exhibit, Nevertheless, They Persisted: Women’s Voting Rights and the 19th Amendment, on view through December 5, 2021. Copies of The Woman’s Hour and The Woman’s Hour young readers adaptation are available for sale through the OHS Museum Store. Order your copy by emailing museumstore@ohs.org. All proceeds from sales in the OHS Museum Store support the OHS mission. Ability Accommodation Information This event provides the following accommodations: Handicap Accessible About The Woman’s Hour Nashville, August 1920. Thirty-five states have approved the 19th Amendment, granting women the right to…

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Joanne B. Freeman: Virtual Hatfield Lecture

The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War Joanne B. Freeman, a professor of history and American studies at Yale University, is a leading expert on early American politics and culture. The author of the award-winning Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic, and editor of Alexander Hamilton: Writings and The Essential Hamilton, readers know Freeman best for her expertise in dirty, nasty politics. Her most recent book, The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War—a New York Times notable book of 2018 and a finalist for the Lincoln Prize—explores the impact and legacies of physical violence in the U.S. Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War. Long committed to public-minded history, she…

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Delve Readers Seminar: History of the Peloponnesian War

The Peloponnesian War is the Ancient Greek historian Thucydides’s account of the strife, conflict, civil war, and military and political catastrophe he witnessed and lived through as a citizen of Athens during and after the reign of the great Pericles in the 5th century BCE–the height of the classical period. A lifelong student of democracy, his meticulous and dramatic analysis of the decades-long strife between Athens and Sparta presents a complex and probing picture of politics, character, and what he calls stasis–protracted and irresolvable civil conflict. One of the masterpieces of world history, The Peloponnesian War has proven an enduring and strikingly relevant classic for modern thinkers, writers, and students of politics. In this six week seminar, we will read through and thoroughly discuss the…

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Marc C. Johnson in Conversation With Steve Duin

While political history has plenty to say about the impact of Ronald Reagan’s election to the presidency in 1980, four Senate races that same year have garnered far less attention — despite their similarly profound political effect. Marc C. Johnson’s new book, Tuesday Night Massacre (University of Oklahoma Press), looks at those races. In examining the defeat in 1980 of Idaho’s Frank Church, South Dakota’s George McGovern, John Culver of Iowa, and Birch Bayh of Indiana, Johnson tells the story of the beginnings of the divisive partisanship that has become a constant feature of American politics. The turnover of these seats not only allowed Republicans to gain control of the Senate for the first time since 1954, but also fundamentally altered the conduct of American…

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