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Tag: powell’s books

Powell’s Books Presents Rebecca Solnit in Conversation With Cheryl Strayed – SOLD OUT

This Event is All Ages and Reserved Seating. ALL SALES ARE FINAL. PLEASE, DOUBLE CHECK YOUR ORDER BEFORE PURCHASING. NO REFUNDS. TO ACCESS PRESALE TICKETS, CLICK ON “TICKETS” AND ENTER THE PASSWORD ON “ENTER PROMO CODE” An Evening With the Author of Men Explain Things to Me Renowned feminist writer Rebecca Solnit has been writing important, acclaimed, prize-winning books for years. Her 2014 essay collection, Men Explain Things to Me, won her an ardent readership among a new generation of young women readers who found a welcome touchstone in Solnit’s articulation of the female experience. Solnit’s new memoir, Recollections of My Nonexistence, offers an electric portrait of the artist as a young woman — and asks how a writer finds her voice in a society…

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Thom Hartmann

In his new book, The Hidden History of the War on Voting (Berrett-Koehler), progressive radio host Thom Hartmann unveils the strategies and tactics that conservative elites in this country have used, from the foundation of the Electoral College to the latest voter ID laws, to protect their interests by preventing “the wrong people” – such as the poor, women, and people of color – from voting, while making it more convenient for the wealthy and white. He also lays out a variety of simple, common-sense ways that we the people can fight back and reclaim our right to rule through the ballot box.

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Ander Monson

Ander Monson’s new story collection, The Gnome Stories (Graywolf), focuses on characters who are loners in the truest sense – who are in the process of recovering from mental, physical, or emotional trauma, and who find solace – or at least a sense of purpose – in peculiar jobs and pursuits. Personal and idiosyncratic, Monson’s new collection of essays, I Will Take the Answer (Graywolf), showcases his deep thinking and broad-ranging interests, his sly wit, his soft spot for heavy metal, and his ability to tunnel deeply into the odd and revealing, sometimes subterranean, worlds of American life.

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Charles Finch

London, 1855. A young and eager Charles Lenox faces his toughest case yet: a murder without a single clue. Slumped in a third-class car at Paddington Station is the body of a handsome young gentleman. He has no luggage, empty pockets, and no sign of identification on his person. Written in Charles Finch’s unmistakably witty and graceful voice, The Last Passenger (Minotaur) is a cunning, thrilling, and deeply satisfying conclusion to this trilogy of prequels to his Charles Lenox series.

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John Sayles

In Yellow Earth, the site of Three Nations reservations on the Missouri River in North Dakota, film director and author John Sayles introduces us to Harleigh Killdeer, chairman of the Tribal Business Council, who is contracted by an oil firm to spearhead the new Three Nations Petroleum Company. What follows in his new novel, Yellow Earth (Haymarket), with characteristic lyrical dexterity, insight, and wit, introduces us to a memorable cast of characters, weaving together narratives of competing worlds through masterful storytelling. Set shortly before Standing Rock would become a symbol of historic proportions of the brutal confrontation between Native resistance and the forces of big business and law enforcement, the fate of Yellow Earth serves as a parable for our times.

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Dan Pfeiffer

From Dan Pfeiffer, cohost of Pod Save America, comes Un-Trumping America (Twelve), a sharp political playbook for how Democrats can take on Trump, McConnell, Fox News, and the rest of the right-wing circus dominating American politics. Pfeiffer worked for nearly 20 years at the center of Democratic politics, from the campaign trail to Capitol Hill to Barack Obama’s White House. Here, Pfeiffer urges Democrats to embrace bold solutions – from fixing the courts to abolishing the electoral college to eliminating the filibuster – in order to make America more democratic (and Democratic).

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Classics Book Group

This month our group meets to discuss La Princesse de Clèves by Madame de La Fayette. Join us!

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Courtney Maum in Conversation With Kimberly King Parsons

It is 1937, and Europe is on the brink of war. Hitler is circulating a most-wanted list of “cultural degenerates.” To prevent the destruction of her favorite art (and artists), impetuous American heiress and art collector Leonora Calaway begins chartering boats and planes for an elite group of surrealists to Costalegre, a mysterious resort in the Mexican jungle. The story of what happens to these artists when they reach their destination is told from the point of view of Lara, Leonora’s neglected 15-year-old daughter. Heartbreaking and strange, Courtney Maum’s Costalegre (Tin House) is inspired by the real-life relationship between the heiress Peggy Guggenheim and her daughter, Pegeen. Maum will be joined in conversation by Kimberly King Parsons, author of Black Light.

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Megan Fernandes

In an era of rising nationalism and geopolitical instability, Megan Fernandes’s Good Boys (Tin House) offers a complex portrait of messy feminist rage, negotiations with race and travel, and existential dread in the Anthropocene. Ultimately, Fernandes’s poems possess an affection for the doomed: false beloveds, the hounded earth, civilizations intent on their own ruin.

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Chana Porter

A blend of searing social commentary and speculative fiction, Chana Porter’s The Seep (Soho) explores a world in the wake of a benign alien invasion. Trina FastHorse Goldberg-Oneka is a 50-year-old trans woman whose life is irreversibly altered in the wake of a gentle – but nonetheless world-changing – invasion by an alien entity called The Seep. A strange new elegy of love and loss, The Seep explores grief, alienation, and the ache of moving on.

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