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Tag: powell’s books

Jenny Lawson in Conversation With Luvvie Ajayi Jones (Ticketed Virtual Event)

As Jenny Lawson’s hundreds of thousands of fans know, she suffers from depression. In Broken (In the Best Possible Way) (Henry Holt), she explores her experimental treatment of transcranial magnetic stimulation with brutal honesty. But also with brutal humor. Lawson discusses the frustration of dealing with her insurance company in “An Open Letter to My Insurance Company,” which should be an anthem for anyone who has ever had to call their insurance company to try and get a claim covered. She tackles such timelessly debated questions as “How do dogs know they have penises?” We see how her vacuum cleaner almost set her house on fire, how she was attacked by three bears, business ideas she wants to pitch to Shark Tank, and why she…

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Powell’s Used Book Drive

Support Powell’s and four amazing local nonprofits during Powell’s Book Drive! Donate your unwanted used books to Powell’s and we’ll pass your proceeds on to one of our partner nonprofits. Powell’s Book Drive will be held April 2 through 30 at Powell’s Industrial Warehouse, located at 2720 NW 29th Ave. Drop-offs are welcome between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. All COVID-19 safety protocols, including mandatory face masks and social distancing, will be observed during the Book Drive. Book Drive sales are donation only. If you wish to sell us your books for cash or credit, please use our Online Buyback program. Before you come As with all books sold or donated to Powell’s, we ask that donors inspect the condition of the items you’re offering…

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Vanessa O’Brien in Conversation With Phil Powers

Long before she became the first American woman to summit K2 and the first British woman to return from its summit alive, Vanessa O’Brien was a feisty suburban Detroit teenager forced to reinvent her world in the wake of a devastating loss that destroyed her family. Making her own way in the world, O’Brien strove to reach her lofty ambitions. Soon, armed with an MBA and a wry sense of humor, she climbed the corporate ladder to great success, but after the 2009 economic meltdown, her career went into a tailspin. She searched for a new purpose and settled on an unlikely goal: climbing Mount Everest. When her first attempt ended in disaster, she trudged home, humbled but wiser. Two years later, she made it…

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Jonathan Meiburg in Conversation With Michael Azerrad

In 1833, Charles Darwin was astonished by an animal he met in the Falkland Islands: handsome, social, and oddly crow-like falcons that were “tame and inquisitive… quarrelsome and passionate,” and so insatiably curious that they stole hats, compasses, and other valuables from the crew of the Beagle. Darwin wondered why these birds were confined to remote islands at the tip of South America, sensing a larger story, but he set this mystery aside and never returned to it. Almost 200 years later, Jonathan Meiburg takes up this chase. He takes us through South America, from the fog-bound coasts of Tierra del Fuego to the tropical forests of Guyana, in search of these birds: striated caracaras, which still exist, though they’re very rare. He reveals the…

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Brian David Johnson in Conversation With Cory Doctorow

If you’re like most people, thinking about tomorrow makes you anxious. You may have dreams of what you want to do or where you want to be in the next few months, years, or decade, but you’re fearful because you don’t know what may await. Unfortunately, this apprehension affects how you make decisions today — the kind of decisions that will impact your life tomorrow. Acclaimed futurist Brian David Johnson has spent a quarter century helping governments, Fortune 500 corporations, and other organizations chart successful paths forward by showing them what the world will soon look like. Now, he uses his prognosticator’s skill to help you be your best self — to help you see the future, and your place in it, in a new…

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Kale Williams in Conversation With Jon Mooallem

Six days after giving birth, a polar bear named Aurora got up and left her den at the Columbus Zoo, leaving her tiny, squealing cub to fend for herself. Hours later, Aurora still hadn’t returned. The cub was furless and blind, and with her temperature dropping dangerously, the zookeepers entrusted with her care felt they had no choice: They would have to raise one of the most dangerous predators in the world themselves, by hand. Over the next few weeks, a group of veterinarians and zookeepers would work around the clock to save the cub, whom they called Nora. Humans rarely get as close to a polar bear as Nora’s keepers got with their fuzzy charge. But the two species have long been intertwined. Three…

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Whitney Otto in Conversation With Lidia Yuknavitch

In Art for the Ladylike (Mad Creek Books), Whitney Otto, author How to Make an American Quilt, limns the lives of eight pioneering women photographers — Sally Mann, Imogen Cunningham, Judy Dater, Ruth Orkin, Tina Modotti, Lee Miller, Madame Yvonne, and Grete Stern — to in turn excavate her own writer’s life. The result is an affecting exploration of what it means to be a woman, what it means to be an artist, and the perils and rewards of being both at once. In considering how feminism, career, and motherhood were entangled throughout her subjects’ lives as they tirelessly sought to render their visions and paved the way for others creating within the bounds of domesticity, Otto assesses her own struggles with balancing writing and…

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Chanda Prescod-Weinstein in Conversation With Elissa Washuta

From a star theoretical physicist comes a journey into the world of particle physics and the cosmos — and a call for a more just practice of science. In The Disordered Cosmos (Bold Type Books), Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein shares her love for physics, from the Standard Model of Particle Physics and what lies beyond it, to the physics of melanin in skin, to the latest theories of dark matter — all with a new spin informed by history, politics, and the wisdom of Star Trek. One of the leading physicists of her generation, Prescod-Weinstein is also one of fewer than 100 Black American women to earn a PhD from a department of physics. Her vision of the cosmos is vibrant, buoyantly non-traditional, and grounded in…

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Michelle Nijhuis in Conversation With Elena Passarello

In the late 19th century, as humans came to realize that our rapidly industrializing and globalizing societies were driving other animal species to extinction, a movement to protect and conserve them was born. In Beloved Beasts (W. W. Norton), acclaimed science journalist Michelle Nijhuis traces the movement’s history: from early battles to save charismatic species such as the American bison and bald eagle to today’s global effort to defend life on a larger scale. Nijhuis describes the vital role of scientists and activists such as Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson, as well as lesser-known figures in conservation history; she reveals the origins of vital organizations like the Audubon Society and the World Wildlife Fund; she explores current efforts to protect species such as the whooping…

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Rebecca Solnit in Conversation With Jia Tolentino (Ticketed Virtual Event)

In Recollections of My Nonexistence (Penguin), Rebecca Solnit, author of A Field Guide to Getting Lost and Men Explain Things to Me, describes her formation as a writer and as a feminist in 1980s San Francisco, in an atmosphere of gender violence on the street and throughout society and the exclusion of women from cultural arenas. She tells of being poor, hopeful, and adrift in the city that became her great teacher, and of the small apartment that, when she was 19, became the home in which she transformed herself. She explores the forces that liberated her as a person and as a writer — books themselves; the gay community that presented a new model of what else gender, family, and joy could mean; and…

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