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Tag: powell’s

April Henry, June Hur, L.E. Flynn in Conversation With Miranda Doyle

When Savannah disappears soon after arguing with her mom’s boyfriend, everyone assumes she’s run away. The truth is much worse. She’s been kidnapped by a man in a white van who locks her in an old trailer home, far from prying eyes. Master mystery writer April Henry weaves another heart-stopping YA thriller with The Girl in the White Van (Henry Holt). Set in Joseon Dynasty-era Korea, June Hur’s evocative YA debut, The Silence of Bones (Feiwel & Friends), follows a 16-year-old indentured servant within the police bureau who becomes entangled in the politically charged investigation into the murder of a noblewoman. Seventeen-year-old Tabby went into the woods with her boyfriend, but she came out alone. Originally praised as a survivor, Tabby is now widely suspected…

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Ariel Kusby in Conversation With Pam Grossman

Ariel Kusby’s The Little Witch’s Book of Spells (Chronicle) is an enchanting compendium of spells, potions, and activities for kids 8 to 12 years old. Young witches-in-training will discover spells to resolve problems, foster friendship, and engage with the natural world. Kusby’s spellbinding book guides readers on how to craft a magic wand, befriend a fairy, and read tea leaves, as well as glossaries of magical terms and symbols. The Little Witch’s Book of Spells harnesses magic and the imagination to help little witches feel powerful, tap into creative energy, and practice self-love. Spells and activities include Best Friends Forever Spell, Jump Rope Protection Spell, Get Well Soon Elixir, Blanket Fort Magical Fortress Spell, How to Make a Magical Fairy Garden, and Mermaid Bath Spell.…

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Katherine Sharp Landdeck With Nell Bright, Moderated by Tracy V. Wilson

Historian Katherine Sharp Landdeck’s The Women With Silver Wings (Crown) is the thrilling true story of the daring female aviators who helped the United States win World War II — only to be forgotten by the country they served. Landdeck introduces us to these young women as they meet even-tempered, methodical Nancy Love and demanding visionary Jacqueline Cochran, the trailblazing pilots who first envisioned sending American women into the air, and whose rivalry would define the Women Airforce Service Pilots. While not authorized to serve in combat, the WASP helped train male pilots for service abroad and ferried bombers and pursuits across the country. Thirty-eight of them would not survive the war. But even taking into account these tragic losses, Love and Cochran’s social experiment…

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Ezekiel J. Emanuel in Conversation With Jonathan Cohn

Preeminent doctor and bioethicist Ezekiel J. Emanuel is repeatedly asked one question: Which country has the best healthcare? He set off to find an answer. The US spends more than any other nation, nearly $4 trillion, on healthcare. Yet, for all that expense, the US is not ranked #1 — not even close. In Which Country Has the World’s Best Healthcare? (PublicAffairs), Emanuel profiles 11 of the world’s healthcare systems in pursuit of the best — or at least where excellence can be found. Using a unique comparative structure, the book allows healthcare professionals, patients, and policymakers alike to know which systems perform well, and why, and which face endemic problems. From Taiwan to Germany, Australia to Switzerland, the most inventive healthcare providers tackle a…

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Megan Margulies in Conversation With Jacque Nodell

Megan Margulies’s My Captain America (Pegasus) is a finely wrought coming-of-age memoir about the author’s relationship with her beloved grandfather, Joe Simon, cartoonist and cocreator of Captain America. Evoking New York City both in the 1980s and ’90s and during the Golden Age of comics in the 1930s and ’40s, My Captain America flashes back from Margulies’s story to chart the life and career of Rochester native Joe Simon, from his early days retouching publicity photos and doing spot art for magazines, to his partnership with Jack Kirby at Timely Comics (the forerunner of Marvel Comics), which resulted in the creation of beloved characters like Captain America, the Boy Commandos, and Fighting American. My Captain America offers a tender and sharply observed account of Margulies’s…

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Adrienne Raphel in Conversation With Bianca Bosker

Almost as soon as it appeared, the crossword puzzle had already become indispensable to our lives. Invented practically by accident in 1913, when a newspaper editor was casting around for something to fill empty column space, it became a roaring commercial success practically overnight. Ever since then, the humble puzzle has been an essential ingredient of any newspaper worth its salt. Blending first-person reporting from the world of crosswords with a delightful telling of its rich literary history, Adrienne Raphel dives into the secrets of this classic pastime. At the annual American Crossword Puzzle Tournament, she rubs shoulders with elite solvers of the world; aboard a crossword-themed cruise, she picks the brains of the enthusiasts whose idea of a good time is a week on…

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Jim Tankersley in Conversation With Amy Wang

For over a decade, Jim Tankersley, tax and economics reporter for The New York Times, has been on a journey to understand what the hell happened to the world’s greatest middle-class success story — the post-World War II boom that faded into decades of stagnation and frustration for American workers. In The Riches of This Land (PublicAffairs), Tankersley fuses the story of forgotten Americans — struggling women and men who he met on his journey into the travails of the middle class — with important new economic and political research, providing fresh understanding of how to create a more widespread prosperity. His analysis begins with the revelation that women and minorities played a far more crucial role in building the post-war middle class than today’s…

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Suzanne Nossel in Conversation With Jacob Weisberg

Online trolls and fascist chat groups. Controversies over campus lectures. Cancel culture versus censorship. The daily hazards and debates surrounding free speech dominate headlines and fuel social media storms. In an era where one tweet can launch — or end — your career, and where free speech is often invoked as a principle but rarely understood, learning to maneuver the fast-changing, treacherous landscape of public discourse has never been more urgent. In Dare to Speak: Defending Free Speech for All (Dey Street), PEN America CEO Suzanne Nossel, a leading voice in support of free expression, delivers a vital, necessary guide to maintaining democratic debate that is open, freewheeling but at the same time respectful of the rich diversity of backgrounds and opinions in a changing…

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Kendra Atleework in Conversation With Caitlin Myer

Kendra Atleework grew up in Swall Meadows, in the Owens Valley of the Eastern Sierra Nevada, where annual rainfall averages five inches and in drought years measures closer to zero. Atleework’s parents taught their children to thrive in this beautiful, if harsh, landscape, prone to wildfires, blizzards, and gale-force winds. Above all, they were raised on unconditional love and delight in the natural world. After Atleework’s mother died of a rare autoimmune disease when Atleework was just 16, however, her once beloved desert world came to feel empty and hostile, as climate change, drought, and wildfires intensified. The Atleework family fell apart, even as her father tried to keep them together. Atleework escaped to Los Angeles, and then Minneapolis, land of tall trees, full lakes,…

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Kids’ Storytime With Blair Thornburgh & Kate Berube

Author Blair Thornburgh and illustrator Kate Berube join us to present their new picture book, Second Banana (Abrams). The kids in Mrs. Millet’s class are putting on their annual nutrition pageant. Every kid plays a food. Every kid gets a line. It is a big deal. But this year, there aren’t quite enough parts for everybody. So the class is cast: Fish, Cheese, Broccoli, Blueberry, Banana, and… Second Banana. Second Banana feels rotten. She wants to be the ONLY banana! In their deliciously original school story, Thornburgh and Berube recognize the dreadful disappointment that a casting list can cause — as well as the power of friendship, creative thinking, and a good attitude to turn a rotten situation into one that’s quite ap-peel-ing. Showtime! Register…

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