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Tag: racism

Etan Thomas in Conversation With Dave Zirin

In his new book, Police Brutality and White Supremacy: The Fight Against American Traditions (Edge of Sports), Etan Thomas, an 11-year NBA veteran, weaves together his personal experiences with police violence and white supremacy with multiple interviews of family members of victims of police brutality like exonerated Central Park Five survivor, Raymond Santana, and Rodney King’s daughter, Lora Dene King; as well as activist athletes and other public figures such as Steph Curry, Chuck D, Isiah Thomas, Sue Bird, Jake Tapper, Jemele Hill, Stan Van Gundy, Kyle Korver, Mark Cuban, Rick Strom, and many more. Thomas speaks with retired police officers about their efforts to change policing, and white allies about their experiences with privilege and their ability to influence other white people. Thomas also…

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Delve Readers Seminar: 9/11 Literatures and the Global War on Terror: 20th Anniversary

2021 marks the 20th Anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attack and a period classified as the “global war on terror.” In this Delve seminar we will read, reflect, and discuss the literary responses to the immediate and the long-term impacts of the war on terror and the rise of xenophobia, Islamophobia, and the changing socio-political landscape of American life post 9/11. The literary texts that we will read will provide some broad understanding about public anxiety and trauma, particularly for those who experienced 9/11 closely and those that belonged to the Muslim-American communities. We will also unpack various representations and debates surrounding the ways in which the figure of the terrorist, terrorism, torture, racism and Islamophobia have informed the study of the 9/11 genre. Please…

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Historians and the News: Kathleen Belew

A Historical Perspective on the White Power Movement, the January 6 Insurrection, and the Domestic Legacies of Overseas Wars OHS is excited to re-launch the popular “Historians and the News” series with a conversation between Dr. Kathleen Belew and Dr. Christopher McKnight Nichols. This free virtual event promises to offer valuable insights, informed by years of scholarly analysis of the past, into the news stories that fill our screens and newspaper pages. As the House select committee investigating the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6 has begun to hold hearings and new reporting reveals the seriousness of the attempt to overturn the 2020 election, militaristic white-supremacist organizations such as the Proud Boys continue to hold rallies in cities including Portland, Salem, and…

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A Conversation with Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, hosted by University of Portland

Come hear Dr. Kendi as he engages the community in a dynamic conversation. ReadUP 2021 will conclude with the Schoenfeldt Distinguished Visiting Writers Series hosting Dr. Kendi as he engages the community in a dynamic conversation that addresses questions submitted by UP community members in advance of the event and, if time allows, from event attendees. Questions for Dr. Kendi? Book discussion groups across campus will harvest questions, and for those reading on their own, UP community members can supply questions on this simple form; sign in with your UP credentials. Questions submitted by 5pm on Monday, March 29 will be generously curated by staff in the Office of International Education, Diversity and Inclusion, with the goal of hearing from as many people as possible.…

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THE SUM OF US: Heather McGhee, presented by West x Midwest

Co-presented by Literary Arts, The Loft (Minneapolis, MN), Black Mountain Institute (Las Vegas, NV), and Wisconsin Book Festival (Madison, WI). Register FREE at https://www.crowdcast.io/e/wbf-sum-of-us/register. ABOUT THE SUM OF US One of today’s most insightful and influential thinkers offers a powerful exploration of inequality and the lesson that generations of Americans have failed to learn: Racism has a cost for everyone—not just for people of color. “This is the book I’ve been waiting for.”—Ibram X. Kendi, #1 New York Times bestselling author of How to Be an Antiracist Heather McGhee’s specialty is the American economy—and the mystery of why it so often fails the American public. From the financial crisis to rising student debt to collapsing public infrastructure, she found a common root problem: racism. But not just in the…

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What America Can Learn From Germany

Aconversation with Susan Neiman, moderated by Mary Johnson Susan Neiman translates the German word Vergangenheitsaufarbeitung as “working off the past,” a description of the process by which Germany has confronted its history of Nazism. In her 2019 book Learning From the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil, Neiman explores this decades-long process and by way of comparison, how the United States might do the same with its legacy of slavery and contemporary racism. Amidst a national reckoning about racism, reparations, and monuments in the United States, Neiman and Mary Johnson engage in an important conversation about confronting the evils of the past. Co-sponsored by OJMCHE, Oregon Historical Society, and WorldOregon Susan Neiman grew up in Atlanta during the civil rights movement. She studied philosophy…

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Talking about Challenging Topics with Kids with author of A Kids Book About Racism, Jelani Memory

OJMCHE is extremely excited to host Jelani Memory, CEO of the A Kids Book About series and author of A Kids Book About Racism. During this 90 minute professional development, Jelani will talk about how he and the authors he works with approach writing about and discussing challenging and complex topics with kids as young as five years old! Further, educators will learn how these books can be used to address Senate Bill 664 (Oregon’s Holocaust and Genocide mandate) and have time to discuss how they might bring this learning into their classroom during small group breakout rooms. The session will conclude with time for questions and answers in the full group. Date: November 11, 2020 Time: 10 – 11:30; 2 PDUs available Cost: FREE…

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Shayla Lawson & Emma Dabiri

Shayla Lawson is major. You don’t know who she is. Yet. But that’s okay. She is on a mission to move black girls like herself from best supporting actress to a starring role in the major narrative. Whether she’s taking on workplace microaggressions or upending racist stereotypes about her home state of Kentucky, she looks for the side of the story that isn’t always told, the places where the voices of black girls haven’t been heard. The essays in Lawson’s This Is Major: Notes on Diana Ross, Dark Girls, and Being Dope (Harper Perennial) ask questions like: Why are black women invisible to AI? What is “black girl magic”? Or: Am I one viral tweet away from becoming Twitter famous? And: How much magic does…

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Writing White Fragility: An Editorial Discussion

Brandon Taylor, author of Booker Prize finalist Real Life and senior editor of Recommended Reading, talks to Ross Feeler about “Parisian Honeymoon,” a story about a man who discovers that his new wife is a bigot. They will discuss their editing process, and how to write anti-racist stories with racist characters without being morally didactic. Q&A to follow.

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Jewell Parker Rhodes & Kelly McWilliams

From award-winning, bestselling author Jewell Parker Rhodes (Ghost Boys) comes a powerful coming-of-age story about two brothers, one who presents as white, the other as black, and the complex ways in which they are forced to navigate the world, all while training for a fencing competition. Powerful and emotionally gripping, Black Brother, Black Brother (Little, Brown) is a careful examination of the school-to-prison pipeline and follows one boy’s fight against racism and his empowering path to finding his voice. Agnes loves her home of Red Creek. There, she cares tirelessly for her younger siblings and follows the town’s strict laws. What she doesn’t know is that Red Creek is a cult, controlled by a madman who calls himself a prophet. Then Agnes meets Danny, an…

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