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Tag: sociology

Oprah Winfrey and Bruce D. Perry, MD, PhD in Conversation With Arianna Davis (Ticketed Virtual Event)

Our earliest experiences shape our lives far down the road, and What Happened to You?: Conversations on Trauma, Resilience, and Healing (Flatiron) provides powerful scientific and emotional insights into the behavioral patterns so many of us struggle to understand. “Through this lens we can build a renewed sense of personal self-worth and ultimately recalibrate our responses to circumstances, situations, and relationships. It is, in other words, the key to reshaping our very lives” (Oprah Winfrey). This book is going to change the way you see your life. Have you ever wondered, “Why did I do that?” or “Why can’t I just control my behavior?” Others may judge our reactions and think, “What’s wrong with that person?” When questioning our emotions, it’s easy to place the…

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Submission Deadline: Oregon Humanities: Features for “Climate”

For the summer issue of Oregon Humanities magazine, we want to hear stories and ideas about what global climate change means for the people and land of this place. Tell us about how climate change and its myriad consequences affect your work, or how you choose what work to do; how you raise your children, or whether you decide to have them; how you vote; where you live; what you eat. How are Oregonians adapting to climate change personally and politically? Who are building visionary communities in these rapidly changing climates? What possibilities does climate change provide, and what does it foreclose? What about other kinds of climate—political winds, social ambiance, architecture and infrastructure, work environment, and other prevailing conditions? We’re looking particularly for stories…

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THE SUM OF US: Heather McGhee, presented by West x Midwest

Co-presented by Literary Arts, The Loft (Minneapolis, MN), Black Mountain Institute (Las Vegas, NV), and Wisconsin Book Festival (Madison, WI). Register FREE at https://www.crowdcast.io/e/wbf-sum-of-us/register. ABOUT THE SUM OF US One of today’s most insightful and influential thinkers offers a powerful exploration of inequality and the lesson that generations of Americans have failed to learn: Racism has a cost for everyone—not just for people of color. “This is the book I’ve been waiting for.”—Ibram X. Kendi, #1 New York Times bestselling author of How to Be an Antiracist Heather McGhee’s specialty is the American economy—and the mystery of why it so often fails the American public. From the financial crisis to rising student debt to collapsing public infrastructure, she found a common root problem: racism. But not just in the…

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Sexual Citizens: A Landmark Study of Sex, Power, and Assault on Campus

The fear of campus sexual assault has become an inextricable part of the college experience. Research has shown that by the time they graduate, as many as one in three women and almost one in six men will have been sexually assaulted. Drawing on the Sexual Health Initiative to Foster Transformation (SHIFT) at Columbia University, the most comprehensive study of sexual assault on a campus to date, Shamus Khan presents a new framework that emphasizes sexual assault’s social roots. Empathetic and insightful, Sexual Citizens (W. W. Norton) (coauthored by Jennifer S. Hirsch) transforms our understanding of sexual assault and offers a roadmap for how to address it.

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You’re Not Listening: What You’re Missing and Why It Matters

For readers of Susan Cain’s Quiet and Charles Duhigg’s The Power of Habit, You’re Not Listening (Celadon) is an eye-opening wake-up call by New York Times reporter Kate Murphy, drawing attention to the worldwide epidemic of not listening – exposing the profound impact that it is having on us all and showing what we can do about it. Murphy will be joined by Kathryn Zerbe, OHSU professor of psychology, for a conversation moderated by Megan Labrise, editor-at-large of Kirkus Reviews.

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Keynote Lecture: Macarena Gomez-Barris

Macarena Gomez-Barris is a cultural critic, author and Chairperson of Social Science and Cultural Studies at Pratt Institute. She is founder and Director of the Global South Center, a hub for critical inquiry, aesthetic praxis, and experimental forms of social living. Macarena works on cultural memory, race, queer and decolonial theory, and rethinking the anthropocene. She is author of The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives, a book that theorizes social life through five extractive scenes of ruinous capitalism upon Indigenous territories (Duke University Press, 2017). She is also author of Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Politics in the Américas (UC Press, 2018), Where Memory Dwells: Culture and State Violence in Chile (UC Press, 2009), and co-editor with Herman Gray of Towards a…

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Julie M. Albright

In Left to Their Own Devices (Prometheus), digital sociologist Julie M. Albright looks at the many ways younger people, facilitated by technology, are coming “untethered” from traditional aspirations and ideals, and asks: What are the effects of being disconnected from traditional, stabilizing social structures like churches, marriage, political parties, and long-term employment? What does it mean to be human when one’s ties to people, places, jobs, and institutions are weakened or broken, displaced by digital hyperconnectivity?

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