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Tag: us history

Consider This with David Treuer

On July 15, David Treuer, author of The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee, will join Oregon Humanities for a conversation on land, possession, and justice. The history of the Americas is inextricable from the theft of land from Native people. How should we, in the present, deal with this fact? The conversation will take place via Zoom and YouTube. Read more or RSVP now.

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Oregon Historical Society: Rethinking American Grand Strategy

Rethinking American Grand Strategy recasts both historical and modern dimensions of U.S. grand strategy by broadening the factors, events, and figures that could be considered political, and therefore strategic. Join us for a 30-minute lecture with one of the volume’s co-editors and co-authors, Christopher McKnight Nichols, laying out some of the broad themes, major events, and transformations in U.S. grand strategy, including an explanation of how an ensemble of leading scholars approached the history of the United States’ place in the world from the framework of rethinking. Following the book talk, Derrick Olsen will facilitate a discussion between Nichols and Ambassador Mary Carlin Yates on how the historical insights provided in Rethinking American Grand Strategy could aid in reconceptualizing domestic needs and foreign policy in a post-COVID-19 world. Copies…

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Livestream Reading: Jacqueline Keeler

Annie Bloom’s welcomes back Portland author Jacqueline Keeler for a livestream reading from her new book, Standoff: Standing Rock, the Bundy Movement, and the American Story of Sacred Lands. Keeler will be joined in conversation with Bob Sallinger, Director of Conservation at Portland Audubon Society. Register here: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0rcOuvpjgjEt37436YeI1-37-jXcyUtFaS About the book: The Bundy takeover of Oregon’s Malheur Wildlife Refuge and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s standoff against an oil pipeline in North Dakota are two sides of the same story that created America and its deep-rooted cultural conflicts. Through a compelling comparison of conflicting beliefs and legal systems, Keeler explores whether the West has really been won—and for whom. “Jacqueline Keeler, a master storyteller and reporter, crafts a knotty skein, twining together family traditions, Native…

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An Evening with Elaine Weiss

One hundred years after the ratification of the 19th Amendment, the Oregon Historical Society is excited to host Elaine Weiss for a powerful lecture on her latest book, The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote. This special lecture is presented in collaboration with our exhibit, Nevertheless, They Persisted: Women’s Voting Rights and the 19th Amendment, on view through December 5, 2021. Copies of The Woman’s Hour and The Woman’s Hour young readers adaptation are available for sale through the OHS Museum Store. Order your copy by emailing museumstore@ohs.org. All proceeds from sales in the OHS Museum Store support the OHS mission. Ability Accommodation Information This event provides the following accommodations: Handicap Accessible About The Woman’s Hour Nashville, August 1920. Thirty-five states have approved the 19th Amendment, granting women the right to…

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Joanne B. Freeman: Virtual Hatfield Lecture

The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War Joanne B. Freeman, a professor of history and American studies at Yale University, is a leading expert on early American politics and culture. The author of the award-winning Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic, and editor of Alexander Hamilton: Writings and The Essential Hamilton, readers know Freeman best for her expertise in dirty, nasty politics. Her most recent book, The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War—a New York Times notable book of 2018 and a finalist for the Lincoln Prize—explores the impact and legacies of physical violence in the U.S. Congress in the decades leading up to the Civil War. Long committed to public-minded history, she…

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Thom Hartmann in Conversation With David Korten

Thom Hartmann, the most popular progressive radio host in America, looks at the history of the battle against oligarchy in America — and how we can win the latest round. The United States was born in a struggle against the oligarchs of the British aristocracy, and ever since then the history of America has been one of dynamic tension between democracy and oligarchy. And much like the shock of the 1929 crash that woke America up to glaring inequality and the ongoing theft of democracy by that generation’s oligarchs, the coronavirus pandemic of 2020 has laid bare how extensively oligarchs have looted our nation’s economic system, gutted governmental institutions, and stolen the wealth of the former middle class. In The Hidden History of American Oligarchy:…

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Gabrielle Glaser in Conversation With Anna Griffin

During the Baby Boom in 1960s America, women were encouraged to stay home and raise large families, but sex and childbirth were taboo subjects. Premarital sex was common, but birth control was hard to get and abortion was illegal. In 1961, 16-year-old Margaret Erle fell in love and became pregnant. Her enraged family sent her to a maternity home, and after she gave birth, she wasn’t even allowed her to hold her own son. Social workers threatened her with jail until she signed away her parental rights. Her son vanished, his whereabouts and new identity known only to an adoption agency that would never share the slightest detail about his fate. Claiming to be acting in the best interests of all, the adoption business was…

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A Tasting Flight of New Books

OSU Press History Showcase, Presented by the Authors History is always in the making at Oregon State University Press. As this historic year winds to a close, we’ve gathered together the authors of four books published in 2020 that deepen our understanding of and broaden our perspective on Oregon’s past. This sampling of new books explores the agricultural landscape of the hops plant, the underappreciated art of Clifford Gleason, one woman’s fight for racial equity in the U.S. Forest Service, and the emergence of the Pacific Northwest as a global economic force. Prior registration is not required to attend this program. Ability Accommodation Information This event provides the following accommodations: Handicap Accessible Black Woman in Green: Gloria Brown and the Unmarked Trail to Forest Service…

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What America Can Learn From Germany

Aconversation with Susan Neiman, moderated by Mary Johnson Susan Neiman translates the German word Vergangenheitsaufarbeitung as “working off the past,” a description of the process by which Germany has confronted its history of Nazism. In her 2019 book Learning From the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil, Neiman explores this decades-long process and by way of comparison, how the United States might do the same with its legacy of slavery and contemporary racism. Amidst a national reckoning about racism, reparations, and monuments in the United States, Neiman and Mary Johnson engage in an important conversation about confronting the evils of the past. Co-sponsored by OJMCHE, Oregon Historical Society, and WorldOregon Susan Neiman grew up in Atlanta during the civil rights movement. She studied philosophy…

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