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Tag: west

Third Monday Poetry at Wildwood

Last Stand at the Wildwood Saloon poetry reading Signup at 8pm and reading starts at 8:30

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Jeff Alessandrelli & Dao Strom in Conversation With Danielle Frandina

Taking its inspiration from the work of Russian absurdist authors such as Alexander Vvedensky and Daniil Kharms, Jeff Alessandrelli’s Fur Not Light (Burnside Review) interrogates how deep senselessness runs in a post-truth and truthiness world. When Dao Strom’s The Gentle Order of Girls and Boys (Counterpoint) was first published in 2006, it was groundbreaking in its depiction of contemporary young Vietnamese women living in the United States, centering their ordinary lives as mothers, lovers, friends, and daughters against the backdrop of immigration and assimilation. Available now for the first time in paperback, The Gentle Order of Girls and Boys is a beautifully written, psychologically astute foray into the rite of female passage. Alessandrelli and Strom will be joined in conversation by Danielle Frandina, Literary Arts…

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Kids’ Storytime

Join us every Saturday for kids’ storytime. Today we’re reading The Perfect Seat by Minh Lê and Gus Gordon.

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Tiffany Midge in Conversation With Jacqueline Keeler

Why is there no Native woman David Sedaris? Or Native Anne Lamott? Humor categories in publishing are packed with books by funny women and humorous sociocultural-political commentary – but no Native women. There are presumably more important concerns in Indian Country. More important than humor? Among the Diné/Navajo, a ceremony is held in honor of a baby’s first laugh. While the context is different, it nonetheless reminds us that laughter is precious, even sacred. Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s (Bison) is a powerful and compelling collection of Tiffany Midge’s musings on life, politics, and identity as a Native woman in America. Artfully blending sly humor, social commentary, and meditations on love and loss, Midge weaves short, standalone musings into a memoir that stares…

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Tommy Pico

From Whiting Award and American Book Award winner and Lambda finalist, Tommy Pico, comes Feed (Tin House), the final book in the Teebs Cycle. The fourth book in Pico’s tetralogy, Feed is an epistolary recipe for the main character, a poem of nourishment, and a jaunty walk through New York’s High Line Park, with the lines, stanzas, paragraphs, dialogue, and registers approximating the park’s cultivated gardens of wildness. Among its questions, Feed asks: What’s the difference between being alone and being lonely? Can you ever really be friends with an ex? How do you make perfect mac & cheese? Feed is an ode of reconciliation to the wild inconsistencies of a northeast spring, a frustrating season of back-and-forth, of thaw and blizzard, but with a…

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Matt Fraction in Conversation With Chelsea Cain & David Walker

In a new sequence of three graphic novellas by Matt Fraction (and Elsa Charretier), November (Image) follows the lives of three women intersecting in a dark criminal underground. As fire and violence tears through their city on a single day and night, they discover their lives are bound together by a mysterious man who seems to be the cause of it all. Fraction will be joined in conversation by author Chelsea Cain and comic book writer David Walker.

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Kids’ Storytime

Join us for kids’ storytime. Today we’re reading Pokko and the Drum by Matthew Forsythe.

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Jami Attenberg in Conversation With Cheryl Strayed

From acclaimed author Jami Attenberg comes a novel of family secrets: think the drama of Big Little Lies set in the heat of a New Orleans summer. “If I know why they are the way they are, then maybe I can learn why I am the way I am,” says Alex Tuchman of her parents. Now that her father is on his deathbed, Alex – a strong-headed lawyer, devoted mother, and loving sister – feels she can finally unearth the secrets of who Victor is and what he did over the course of his life and career. (A power-hungry real estate developer, he is, by all accounts, a bad man.) She travels to New Orleans to be with her family, but mostly to interrogate her…

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Lindy West

From the moment powerful men started falling to the #MeToo movement, the lamentations began: this is feminism gone too far, this is injustice, this is a witch hunt. In The Witches Are Coming (Hachette), Lindy West, firebrand author of the bestselling memoir and now critically acclaimed Hulu TV series Shrill, turns that refrain on its head. You think this is a witch hunt? Fine. You’ve got one. In a laugh-out-loud, incisive cultural critique, West extolls the world-changing magic of truth, urging readers to reckon with the dark lies at the heart of the American mythos, and unpacking the complicated, and sometimes tragic, politics of not being a white man in the 21st century. She tracks the misogyny and propaganda hidden (or not so hidden) in…

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H. W. Brands

In Dreams of El Dorado (Basic), Pulitzer Prize finalist H. W. Brands tells the thrilling, panoramic story of the settling of the American West. He takes us from John Jacob Astor’s fur trading outpost in Oregon to the Texas Revolution, from the California gold rush to the Oklahoma land rush. He shows how the migrants’ dreams drove them to feats of courage and perseverance that put their stay-at-home cousins to shame – and how those same dreams also drove them to outrageous acts of violence against Indigenous peoples and one another. The West was where riches would reward the miner’s persistence, the cattleman’s courage, the railroad man’s enterprise; but El Dorado was at least as elusive in the West as it ever was in the…

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