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Tag: essay

Submission Deadline: Oregon Humanities: Spring 2022: “Care”

The theme for our Spring 2022 issue is “Care.” We want to hear stories about responsibility and custody, attention and affection, worry and grief. What do you care about, and why? Who do you care for, and who cares for you? Is caring a burden, a privilege, or something in between? Where do you see care, and where do you notice its absence? We’re looking for nonfiction articles and essays exploring what it means to provide care and to receive it, to care about and to be cared for. Tell us how care shows up in our communities and the systems of our society. Share a fresh perspective on health care or childcare or eldercare or tender loving care. Some topics we’re interested in include—but…

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Submission Deadline: De-Canon + Fonograf Ed. Hybrid-Lit Anthology

De-Canon resumes its mission of “de-canonizing” by teaming up with Fonograf Editions to publish an anthology of hybrid-literary works by women and nonbinary BIPOC writers. This anthology will explore multimodal forms of writing that navigate the restless intersections of writing, visual art, and other media, and that innovate in their contemplations – and complications – of language and form. Submissions are open from October 1st to December 15, 2021. What is hybridity? What does it mean, and why does it matter now, to pay heed to hybrid modes of writing and art, to confluences of aesthetic mediums, to processes that make visible the seams and in-between spaces of the realms we ‘make’ in? How does the hybrid form potentially re-define “writing”? And, what fuels a…

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Columbia Writers Series: Sloane Crosley

Sloane Crosley is a fiercely funny author and essayist whose humor is lively and genuine. She is a relentless comedic force who the New York Times called, “an incisive observer of human nature.” Sloane Crosley is the author of The New York Times bestselling essay collections, I Was Told There’d Be Cake and How Did You Get This Number. The former was a finalist for The Thurber Prize for American Humor, and was described as “perfectly, relentlessly funny” by David Sedaris. Her debut novel, The Clasp, was a national bestseller, a New York Times editor’s choice, and it has been optioned for film by Universal Pictures. Sloane’s most recent book of essays, Look Alive Out There, was met with high praise. Steve Martin said of…

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Submission Deadline: Portland Review

Great news: there is still time to play Truth or Dare with us this fall! We want to see work that deals with truth – uncovering it, hiding it, coming to a personal truth, living your truth, or work that delivers us the truths you’ve discovered about life. We dare you to send us writing that pushes boundaries. Something that might be adventurous in form, content, subject, or execution. If you’re willing to take the plunge, we’re willing to come with. As with any game, we ask that you follow just a couple of rules. Poetry submissions must be limited to three poems, and fiction or creative nonfiction submissions must be under 5,000 words. The deadline to submit is Sunday, October 31st 2021 at 11:59pm PST.…

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Alyssa Milano in Conversation With Charlotte Clymer / Ticketed Event

Sorry Not Sorry (Dutton) is Alyssa Milano’s sharply observed, uproarious, and deeply intimate ode to the life she has lived and the issues that matter most. In her new book, the actress and activist delivers a collection of powerful personal essays that get to the heart of her life, career, and all-out humanitarianism. Milano’s essays are unvarnished and elegant, funny and heartbreaking, and utterly real. A timely book that shows in almost real time the importance of taking care of others, it also gives a gut-punch-level wake-up call in an era where the noise is a distraction from what really needs to happen, if we want to live in a better world. These are stories of growing up in celebrity, of family and of friends,…

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Pre-Show Author Talk & Book Signing with Emilly Prado

Join us for a special pre-show author talk and book signing with Chicana writer Emilly Prado, author of Funeral For Flaca. She will read a brief excerpt from the book that retraces her experience coming of age as a prep-turned-chola-turned-punk in this collection that is one-part memoir-in-essays, and one-part playlist, zigzagging across genres and decades, much like the rapidly changing and varied tastes of her youth. For anyone that purchases a copy of the book at the event, Emilly will stay after and sign them for the guests in attendance. All guests who attend events or gatherings at The Armory must provide documentation that they have been fully vaccinated for COVID-19 by the date of their visit. If you are unable to be vaccinated, you may provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken…

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The Lyric Essay Intensive: Braiding the World

The lyric essay is a form which allows many small fragments to be drawn together to create a whole. A lyric essay might hold memories, research, a bit of poetry; it celebrates mixing genres. In this workshop, we will write a series of fragments, and then braid them together into essays. You will leave the workshop with a sense of how small pieces of writing can grow into essays. By the end of the 8 weeks, you will have at least one lyric essay to share. Access Program We want our writing classes to be accessible to everyone, regardless of income and background. We understand that our tuition structure can present obstacles for some people. Our Access Program offers writing class registrations at a reduced…

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Inquiry as Narrative w/ Lilly Dancyger

Tuesday, October 12th, 5-8pm Pacific Cost: $150 payment plans available, email Daniel at registration@corporealwriting.com Where: Corporeal Center, 510 SW 3rd Avenue, suite 101, Portland, Or. 97204 Description: There’s often so much emphasis on plot and narrative, but there are other ways to move a story forward. Sometimes the most interesting thing isn’t what happened, and then what happened next, and then what happened next—but what we have to say about what happened, and how our perspective on a single event can shift and change over time. How the very process of writing about an experience—and the research and inquiry that goes into writing about our own lives—can change our relationship to the thing we’re writing about. In this session, we’ll talk about how to shape…

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Grief and the Lyric Essay

Throughout history, writers have used lyrical techniques to access states of consciousness we associate with grief. Lyrical writing prioritizes music, rhythm, and emotion over the narrative arc. The goal of this course is to find entry into writing through reading, conversation,and various prompts and exercises to catalyze memory and thinking. We will consider how writers crafting stories and poetry about grief use lyricism, discursiveness, fragmentation, and silence to embody writing content through form. Participant should be prepared to write a lot! Prompts and exercises will allow students to access various parts of memory. In a short period of time, we will get to know one another and provide a sounding board for our stories in a safe space. We will also look at excerpts from…

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Premise Course: How do we carry borders with us even as we cross them? Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera, Luiselli’s Tell Me How it Ends, Castillo’s The Mixquiahuala Letters

Beautiful question: How do we carry borders with us even as we cross them? (Learn about Premise classes here: https://www.premiseinstitute.com/premisefaq) Texts: Gloria Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera; Ana Castillo’s The Mixquiahuala Letters, and Valeria Luiselli’s Tell Me How it Ends Since its conception in 1848, the US-Mexico border has been a site of conflict, contradiction, and beauty. Although the border continues to feature heavily in our news and politics, it is often described through narratives of violence, national security, and human rights abuses.  In this course, we will delve into works that complicate these narratives by embracing the beauty and possibility of the borderlands. We will begin with Gloria Anzaldúa’s landmark work Borderlands/La Frontera, in which she describes the border as “una herida abierta,” an open wound,…

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